Sunday, October 21, 2018

"Elle M'a Oublie (She Has Forgotten Me)" - Joe Falcon

Early 20th century Cajun music, and the industry that surrounded it, was dominated by men.  Much of this had to do with the reputation the music had among others in the community.  Generally, the music was played in places known for drinking, fighting and decadence; places where a urban lady typically wouldn't be found.  When Cleoma Breaux followed her brother's lead and joined up with Joe Falcon to become a professional musician, she challenged the industry's mentality of the time.   This heightened the group’s drawing power among men, although some women were reportedly resentful – even more so, perhaps, because Cleoma was a sharp dresser whose wardrobe reflected the latest national fashion trends. Atypically, the Falcons were able to make a living playing music alone, with no need for day jobs.

Eh, chère, rapelle-toi j’ai promete,

Et j'étais d’accord, quoi tu m’as fait?

Chère, moi, je peux plus,
T’endurer, jolie cœur.
Toi, tu m’as promis, chère,
De plus faire ça et regarde-donc,
Quoi t'après faire aujourd’hui, chère,
Ça c’est dur, oui, pour moi t’endurer.

Quand même tu veux pas, chère,
T’as pas promis il y a pas longtemps, jolie fille,
Tu rappelle-toi quoi t’as fair, jolie cœur?
Oui, c’est de me voir, chère,
Si loin de toi après jongler sans savoir, jolie fille,
Chère, si jamais tu vas d’etre à la traîne.

Petite, tu devrais, chère,
Viens observer il y a si longtemps quoi t’as fais avec moi,
Chère, si tu jongle à moi,
Tu vas voir pour toi-même.
Petite, si tu voudrais, chère,
Donc, me prendre, tu saurais quoi moi je ferais pour toi-même,
Chère, tu te regretterais-donc jamais toute ta vie.
Cleoma and Joe Falcon
Courtesy of Alain Chenneviere

At this time, the role of women in Cajun music was relegated to the home, and a repertoire that primarily consisted of ballads, lullabies, and other a capella music not conceived for dancing. This mindset made it all the more remarkable when Columbia signed Cleoma, along with her partner Joe, to their own recording contract in 1929.1  The duo brought along her brothers Amede and Ophy to Atlanta as accompaniment. Together, the group recorded a song called "Elle M'a Oublie" (#40508) about a lover's broken promise.   

Hey, dear, remember, I promised,

And I agreed, what did you do to me?

Dear, I can not,
Endure you, pretty sweetheart,
You promised me, dear,
Never to do that, and so look,
What you are doing today, dear,
That's hard, yeah, for me to endure you.

Even if you do not want to, dear,
You didn't promise all that long ago, pretty girl,
Do you remember what you did, pretty sweetheart?
Yeah, it's to see me, dear,
So far from you after reminiscing yet not knowing, pretty girl,
Dear, if you're ever going to lag behind.

Little one, you should, dear,
Come and see how long ago, what you've done with me,
Dear, if you reminisce with me,
You'll see for yourself,
Little one, if you like, dear,
So, take me, you would know what I would do, for yourself,
Dear, you'll never regret this for the rest of your life.
Lake Charles American Press
Dec 14, 1951







  1. http://musicrising.tulane.edu/discover/people/452/Breaux-Cleoma
  2. Lyrics by Stephane F and Francis M

Release Info:
W110551-1 C'est Si Triste San Lui (It Is So Blue Without Him) | Columbia 40508-F OKeh 90008
W110554-2 Elle M'a Oublie (She Has Forgotten Me) | Columbia 40508-F OKeh 90008


Find:
Cajun Early Recordings (JSP, 2004)

Monday, October 15, 2018

"La Valse De La Veuve" - Angelas Lejeune

As the traditional melody of Jolie Blonde made its way around the prairies of south Louisiana, the theme and associated lyrics took on different forms in niche areas throughout the 1920s.  Unlike the musicians living in Rayne and Crowley such as the Breaux Brothers, the musicians living in and around Church Point had their own unique theme for the song.  Accordionist Angelas Lejeune and fiddler Ernest Fruge introduced their version of the tune during a recording session in 1930 called "La Vase De La Veuve" (#18052). As fiddler Wade Fruge recalled, the melody was much older than when the Breaux Brothers had first decided to record it.    

However, instead of singing about a jolie blonde, Angelas chose to sing about a lonely widow and her daughter.  During an interview, Lejeune was asked who the fille de la veuve (daughter of the widow) was.  He recalls:
She was the daughter of a man we called "Doo Doo" Matte.  She later became Mrs. Dave Ledoux. But at the time the words were composed, she lived with her mother. Her father was dead. They lived in Pointe Noir.1   
Angelas Lejeune


Oh, malheureuse, criminelle, misérable.

Oh, chère jolie, chère tite fille, comment t'as fait,
Tu fais ça avec ton nèg', après m'quitter, pour m'en aller.

Oh, chère tite fille, la fille de la veuve, oui, qui est là,
T'étais si belle et si mignonne, oui, ton toupet qui était si bien coupé.

Oh, petite!

Oh, chère tite fille, tu connais t'es tout le temps, oui-z aimer,
Mais, doucement avant de mourir, les flammes d'enfer, pauvre vieille mam' avec ton nègre.
...

The fille was Emma Matte Ledoux.  Her father was known in the community as Joseph "Doo Doo" Matte and his wife, Josephine Doucet, was affectionately known as Madame "Doo Doo".  What makes this version unique is the phrase "toupet qui était si bien coupé", referring to the way she cut her hair, typically the front bangs.   Originally issued on the Brunswick recording label, it seems Melotone re-issued these recordings much later, possibly in 1934.  Author Tony Russell explains:
Melotone was an American-manufactured series marketed to French-speaking Canadians, whether in Québec or in New England.2  
This issue with the dark green logo on the gold circle seems to be the last one in that particular series.

Oh, it's terrible, it's criminal, it's miserable.

Oh, dear pretty one, dear little girl, how come you've done this?
You did that to your old man, leaving me, to go away.

Oh, dear little girl, daughter of the widow, yeh, who is there,
You were so beautiful and so cute, yeh, your forelock that was cut so well.

Oh, little one!

Oh, dearl little girl, you know you're always, hey, lovely,
Well, I'm slowly dying, into the flames of hell, your poor old mom with your dad.
...

This version must have had made some influence further south since Vermilion Parish musicians, the Segura Brothers, recorded essentially the same song in 1934 for John and Alan Lomax.  By 1954, inspired by his cousin Angelas' recording, Cajun accordionist Iry Lejeune resurrected the tune, in which Eddie Shuler mis-titled it as "La Fitte La Vove".  In it, he specifically calls out Madame Doo Doo.   Cousin Rodney Lejeune would do the same for Swallow Records in 1958.  Regarding Angelas' music, collector Eric Simkin states:
I just find these Cajun melodies overwhelming beautiful. Other-world. The primitive-ness of the sound countered by tremendous playing talent is so moving. Like the greatest blues.3  











  1. Tears, Love, and Laughter: The Story of the Acadians by Pierre Daigle
  2. Discussions with Tony Russell
  3. Discussions with Eric S
  4. Lyrics by Stephane F
Release Info:

NO-6700 La Petite One Step | Brunswick 558 Melotone M18052-A
NO-6701 La Valse De La Veuve | Brunswick 558  Melotone M18052-B

Find:
Pioneers of the Cajun Accordion (Arhoolie, 1989)
Let Me Play This For You: Rare Cajun Recordings (Tompkins, 2013)

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

"La Cravat" - Happy, Doc And The Boys

Before the war, Leroy "Happy Fats" Leblanc had a successful recording and radio career, employing many musicians throughout the 1940s.  His KVOL audience would tune into his show where he featured local musicians.  Many of these same musicians would accompany him at the  annual International Rice Festival in Crowley including vocalist Louis Noel. By the late 1940s, record producer J.D. Miller enticed Happy to record for him.  Miller went to Cosimo Matassa's fledgling J&M Recording studio in New Orleans between 1946 and 1949 and recorded singer Happy Fats with fiddler Doc Guidry and singer Louis Noel.   He spoke to author John Broven more specifically later in life:
So I called Cosimo and scheduled a session over there to cut three records, six sides.  So we go over there; we cut "Colinda" by Happy Fats and Doc Guidry, we cut "La Cravat" by Louis Noel, and a country thing.3
Crowley Daily Signal
Oct 13, 1949

Si j’aurais mes souliers,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Si j’aurais mes souliers,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Mes souliers sont ronds,
Ma 'mie, j’aimais tant,
Ma 'mie, j’aimais tant.

Si j’aurais mes beaux bas,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Si j’aurais mes beaux bas,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Mes beaux bas à sentiment,
Mes souliers sont ronds,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant.

Si j’aurais mes jarretières,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Si j’aurais mes jarretières,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Mes jarretières sont entières,
Mes beaux bas à sentiment,
Mes souliers sont ronds,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant.

Si j’aurais ma culotte,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Si j’aurais ma culotte,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Ma culotte à courte botte,
Mes jarretières sont entières,
Mes beaux bas à sentiment,
Mes souliers sont ronds,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant.

Si j’aurais ma chemise,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Si j’aurais ma chemise,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Ma chemise à courte fine,
Ma culotte à courte botte,
Mes jarretières sont entières,
Mes beaux bas à sentiment,
Mes souliers sont ronds,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant.

Si j’aurais ma cravate,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Si j’aurais ma cravate,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Ma cravate à zig et zag,
Et bien bouclée dedans mon cou,
Ma chemise à courte fine,
Ma culotte à courte botte,
Mes jarretières sont entières,
Mes beaux bas à sentiment,
Mes souliers sont ronds,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant.

Si j’aurais mon chapeau,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Si j’aurais mon chapeau,
C’est ma 'mie qui m’a donné,
Mon chapeau est sur me tete,
Ma cravate à zig et zag,
Et bien bouclée dedans mon cou,
Ma chemise à courte fine,
Ma culotte à courte botte,
Mes jarretières sont entières,
Mes beaux bas à sentiment,
Mes souliers sont ronds,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant,
Ma 'mie, j’aimerais tant.

Opelousas Daily World
May 20, 1949


"The country thing" happened to be some songs by Al Terry. It took quite some time before the records arrived from California pressing plants however, he recalls:
I sent the masters off to the West Coast to be pressed, that of course, was 78s, and when I got them back, I was so proud you wouldn't believe.1,2,3
He released his very first Cajun-country record as "La Cravat" (#1000), a children's nursery rhyme from possibly the 17th century, that was passed down orally until the Acadians brought the song to Louisiana. In the 1970s, Marie Pellerin recorded the song for folklorist Dr. Barry Ancelet. This is an old favorite that many older Cajuns remember fondly from their childhoods. It’s a cumulative song about all the clothes the narrator’s sweetheart has given him, including the zig-zag tie of the title.  To this day, the older Cajun folk can still recall their parents and their grand-parents singing this song to them as children.   Louis' daughter recalls:
La Cravat was taught to him by his grandparents.  The song had been handed down from one generation to the next.4

KSLO 1949
Felton Hargroder, Louis Noel, Rita Noel,
Floyd Cormier (MC), Jack Ricahrd


If only I had my shoes,

That my sweetheart gave to me,

If only I had my shoes,

That my sweetheart gave to me,

My shoes are round,

My dear, how I would like that,

My dear, how I would like that.

If only I had my pretty socks,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
If only I had my pretty socks,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
My favorite pretty socks,
My shoes are round,
My dear, how I would like that,
My dear, how I would like that.

If only I had my garters,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
If only I had my garters,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
My garters are whole,
My favorite pretty socks,
My shoes are round,
My dear, how I would like that,
My dear, how I would like that.

If only I had my pants, 
That my sweetheart gave to me,
If only I had my pants, 
That my sweetheart gave to me,
My short knee pants,
My garters are whole,
My favorite pretty socks,
My shoes are round,
My dear, how I would like that,
My dear, how I would like that.

If only I had my shirt,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
If only I had my shirt,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
My fine woven shirt,
My short knee pants,
My garters are whole,
My favorite pretty socks,
My shoes are round,
My dear, how I would like that,
My dear, how I would like that.

If only I had my tie,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
If only I had my tie,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
My zig-zag tie,
Well knotted around my neck,
My fine woven shirt,
My short knee pants,
My garters are whole,
My favorite pretty socks,
My shoes are round,
My dear, how I would like that,
My dear, how I would like that.

If only I had my hat,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
If only I had my hat,
That my sweetheart gave to me,
My hat upon my head,
My zig-zag tie,
Well knotted around my neck,
My fine woven shirt,
My short knee pants,
My garters are whole,
My favorite pretty socks,
My shoes are round,
My dear, how I would like that,
My dear, how I would like that.
Opelousas Daily World
Sep 15, 1950



However, having seen Cosimo's studio, Miller soon got the idea that it would be faster, cheaper and more interesting to put in his own recording studio.1  From then on, his new Feature Records would be recorded in his hometown of Crowley, Louisiana.  Miller's early releases had the letter 'F' in the number to signify a French recording, specifically Cajun French, while the letter 'E' signified and English recording, specifically a country song.   Therefore, Miller's early pressings contain multiple uses of numbers.

By February of 1949, Louis took a chance at an amateur talent show winning first prize.  His talents scored him a place on the radio show listings for KSLO.   There, he performed classic country tunes and his own recordings, billed as the "Ernest Tubbs of Louisiana".5  By 1950, he formed a full band playing in dance halls with the Teche Troubadors. 





  1. Slim Harpo: Blues King Bee of Baton Rouge By Martin Hawkins
  2. South to Louisiana: The Music of the Cajun Bayous By John Broven
  3. Record Makers and Breakers: Voices of the Independent Rock 'n' Roll Pioneers By John Broven
  4. Discussions with Karl W
  5. Opelousas World.  Mar 1949.
Find:
Acadian All Star Special - The Pioneering Cajun Recordings Of J.D. Miller (Bear, 2011)

Friday, October 5, 2018

"Devil In The Bayou" - Harry Choates

One of the stranger, spookier recordings that Cajun fiddler Harry Choates ever created was a haunting instrumental he laid down in Houston for Gold Star records.  Far from anything he had done before, one of Harry Choates’ most enduring compositions was the 1948 "Devil in the Bayou" (#1340).  Not a great hit in its day, the song somehow embodies the stereotype of sinister, supernatural Louisiana.  The manic violin coupled with a relentless piano backing and interspersed with demonic laughter, has a spooky appeal to modern listeners.  More than novelty, it demonstrates Choates’ extraordinary musical ability, achieving a huge range of sounds on the fiddle.3  

He was backed up by three of his original Melody Boys, Pee Wee Lyons on steel guitar, Johnnie Manuel on piano and Pee Wee Maples on guitar, but replaced the other members with Grady Mann on bass and Amos Comeaux on drums.   The bizarre song is another one of Choates' original pieces. Played entirely in the key of A minor (virtually unheard of in hillbilly and Cajun music), author and researcher, Andrew Brown states:
"Devil" reminds one more of the soundtrack to an early horror movie than a country record, with Choate's sinister laughs accompanied by bassist Grady Mann's screams.5  

It had no commercial potential, but record producer Bill Quinn released it anyway.5    According to writer Thomas Townsley,
"Devil in the Bayou" continues to fascinate [Harry's] contemporaries and intrigue listeners. Demons are often a common topic in Cajun-Creole folklore. Among the most famous (and creepy) stories of haunted bayous is the account of feu follets.1  

According to the book, Swapping Stories: Folktales From Louisiana, feu follets  (known as will-o'-the-wisps in American culture) were reportedly unexplained glowing apparitions seen floating along the bayou at night. Many believed these glowing balls of light were demons that wandered the bayou, seeking to lead people astray into the dark. Choates in his song "Devil In the Bayou" brings to light the anxieties and terrors felt by the early superstitious Cajun peoples living along the bayou.1   

Harry himself succumbed to "demons" his whole life, mainly through the effects of his drinking. Legend has it that Harry never owned an instrument in his life; all his music was made on a $7.00 fiddle he borrowed from a friend and never bothered to return.2  He had the ability to drink most dedicated boozehounds under the table and the musical genius to blow just about anybody off of the bandstand.4  According to Brown,
There are a lot of musicians I talked to whose only remembrance of Harry is just this notorious alcoholic drunken bum guy. A lot of people don’t remember anything else but him just getting rip roaring drunk off his ass.4  
In 2002, Andrew Brown commemorated the recording by using it on his Harry Choates CD project, calling it "Devil In The Bayou".



  1. http://neworleansreligion.blogspot.com/2013/03/cajun-devil-folklore.html
  2. The Best of Country Music by John Morthland
  3. https://www.waveglobe.fm/harry-choates-fiddle-king-cajun-swing/
  4. http://www.offbeat.com/articles/harry-choates/
  5. Devil In The Bayou by Andrew Brown.  Liner notes.
Release Info:

1340-A Rye Whiskey | Gold Star 1340-A

1340-B Devil In The Bayou | Gold Star 1340-B

Find:
Harry Choates ‎– The Fiddle King Of Cajun Swing (Arhoolie, 1982, 1993) 
Devil In The Bayou - The Gold Star Recordings (Bear Family, 2002)

Monday, October 1, 2018

"Soldiers Waltz" - Charlie Broussard

Houston provided some of the earliest independent recording producers in the south after WWII, including country western guitarist Bennie Hess.  In addition to Hess' own band, he ventured out and added several Cajun artists to his fledgling Opera label.   He would be instrumental in forging the music career of Iry Lejeune by inviting him to a recording session in 1948.  He would later press several tunes for his Cajun fiddler, Floyd Leblanc.  Charles Broussard, who at the time was playing with Eddie Shuler's Reveliers around 1945, seemed like a good fit for the label.


Quand j'étais à la guerre,

Pour me battre pour mon pays,

Tu m'as promis de m'espérer,

Jusqu'au jour d'aujourd'hui,

Mais asteure j'ai revenir,

J'ai des larmes dans mes yeux,

Et toi, avec un autre,
Qui casse mon coeur en deux.

Quand j'étais sur la bataille,
Pourrais t’avoir pour ma vie,
Te regardant, ouais, 
Z-à toi, chère petite fille,
Mais, asteur, je suis revenu,
Ma vie est gaspillée,
Et toi, avec un autre, chérie,
Qui casse mon cœur en deux.


Charles Broussard

Following World War II, Charles’ sons, Carrol and C. J., were learning the steel guitar and drums, and the youngest, Arnold, played piano, so Charles formed the Sulphur Playboys. The band was adept at many styles and played a mixture of Cajun, country, and hoedown music for dancers and listeners around southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas.1  "Soldier's Waltz" (#109), like "War Widow Waltz", became one of the few Cajun tunes which spoke of the hardships of World War II.   Broussard (spelled as "Brussard") borrowed a popular melody that eventually became popularly known as Doc Guidry's "Le Valse de Te Maurice".  He was backed by Billy Christian on guitar, Carrol Broussard on steel guitar, and C. J. Broussard on drums.




When I was at war,

To fight for my country,

You made me a hopeful promise,

Until the day of today,

Well, right now, I've come back,

I have tears in my eyes,

And you, with another, dear,
That breaks my heart in two. 

When I was in battle,
(Thinking I) could have you forever,
To look at you, yeah,
At you, dear little girl,
Well, right now, I've come back,
My life is wasted,
And you, with another, dearie,
That breaks my heart in two.
Baytown Sun
Jun 30, 1950

Charles played with Eddie Shuler and his All Star Reveliers and Cliff Bruner and the Wanderers in the 1950s. He eventually played on television at KPLC and KTAG, as well as on KIKS radio for the Sulphur Hour radio show. Around 1951 Charles showed his versatility by playing hoedowns for a local square dance club.1




Carrol Broussard, Billy Christian,
Charles Broussard, C. J. Broussard,
Homer Goodrich, Jack Granger
1947

Courtesy of Cajun Dancehall Heyday1




  1. Cajun Dancehall Heyday by Ron Yule
  2. Lyrics by Stephane F and Jordy A
Release Info:

638 Soldiers Waltz | Opera 109-A

639 Sulphur Breakdown | Opera 109-B

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

"Cousinne Lilly" - John Bertrand & Milton Pitre

Right before the Depression took hold, major recording labels wanted a piece of the action that Columbia had engaged in down in south Louisiana.  By the beginning of 1929, other companies like RCA, ARC and Paramount were busy hunting down Cajun musicians in the prairies and sending them to their studios up north.  Two of those musicians were John Homer Bertrand and Milton Pitre.  

La plus vielle de la bande, mais, c'est la plus vaillant,

C'est la plus contente, elle a les yeux canailles,

Mais, dis pas à ta mom, mais, j'ai goutté ton bec,

Mais, dis pas à ton pop, mais, si j'ai pas la bonne tête,
C'est la mienne, mais, au péril de la vie,
Chère cousinne, mais, donne-moi, donc, celle-là
Mais, si c'est pas celle-là moi, j'en veux pas du tout,
Petit galop, mais, pour la Pointe au Pin.


John Bertrand

Bertrand was a blacksmith from the area around Opelousas known as Prairie Ronde.  Together with Milton Pitre, they traveled to Chicago, IL and recorded "Cousinne Lilly" (#12725).   It's most likely that John was singing about the courtship, and eventual marriage, of his brother Eddie to their second cousin, Lillian Joubert.   In the song, he repeats the same verse, changing the placement of the line "petite galop" from the end to the middle.  A "petite galop", or "small gallop", refers to the typical three-beat gait of a horse; also known as a canter. 

The oldest of the group, well, is the most sociable,

She's very calm, she has mischievous eyes,

Well, don't tell your mom, well, I kissed your lips,

Well, don't tell your dad, well, unless you don't have a good mind,
She's mine, well, bet your life,
Dear cousin, well, give her to me, that one,
However, if that one's not mine, I don't want anything,
Let's canter, well, to Pine Point.

Given the lack of Paramount's Cajun releases found in Louisiana, it seems the company missed out on an opportunity.   It's quite possible that Paramount failed to adequately distribute the bulk of this music in the south and struggled to improve sales.  Nevertheless, "Cousinne Lilly" remained a popular tune throughout the Cajun prairies and by 1964, fiddler Adam Hebert scored one of his most well-known versions for Swallow records entitled "La Pointe Aux Pins".  






  1. Lyrics by Stephane F

Release Info:
21076-1 Cousinne Lilly | Paramount 12725-A
21075-2,-3 (La Valse De) Miserable | Paramount 12725-B

Find:

Early American Cajun Music (Yazoo, 1999)
The Rise & Fall of Paramount Records: Volume Two, 1928-1932, CD G (Third Man, 2014)

Friday, September 21, 2018

"Apres Jengler A Toi" - Alley Boys of Abbeville

The Alley Boys represented one of the unique groups to come out of south Louisiana. Influenced by local jazz bands as well as Cajun instrumentation, their group formed when opportunities to play dances in Vermilion parish opened up.   As some of the musicians filled in with orchestras, these close friends decided they could create their own group.  All they needed was a name.  According to Lourse's daughter, Carolyn,
One of the Guidry's lived on a street called Franks Alley, and they'd practice at that location all the time.   Before long, they were calling themselves the Alley Boys.1  


Oh, chère, mais, quelle histoire, mais, ennuyante,

Après jongler, oui, z-à toi,
La vie est dure, mais, pas t'avoir, mais, c'est plus dur,
Mais, j'aimerais, oui, t'avoir, mais, avec moi.

D’après toi, quand je t'ai dis que je t'aimais,
Toi t'as dit, mais, la même chose,
Mais, aujourd'hui, t'es après écouter tous les conseils,
T'auras du regret pour tout ça, mais, toi tu fais.
Leleux Dancehall, 1938
Alley Boys of Abbeville
Lourse Touchet, Frankie Mailhes,
Murphy Guidry, Sidney Guidry
www.loc.gov


Together, the group consisted of Sidney Guidry on guitar, Murphy Guidry on guitar, Lourse "Mockay" Touchet on steel guitar, and Frankie "Tee Tee" Mailhes on fiddle and vocals.   Although their guitarist Sabray Guidry helped form the band, they replaced him with Maxie Touchet on drums. They headed to Memphis, TN where the group recorded "Apres Jengler A Toi" (#05057), a tune based on J.B. Fuselier's "Chere Tu Tu". 


Oh, dearie, well, what a lonely story,

(I am) reminiscing, yeah, about you,
Life is hard, well, not having you, well, it's real hard,
Well, I'd like, yeah, to have you, well, with me.

According to you, when I told you that I loved you,
You told me, well, the same thing,
Well, today, you are listening to all the advice,
You'll regret all that, well, you've done.


Four months later, after their recordings came out, the interest must have been widespread with larger than expected sales.  The local paper claimed:
The records made by the Alley Boys are being sold like "hot cakes" in Southwest Louisiana.2  





  1. Discussions with Carolyn T S
  2. Abbeville Meridional.  Nov 18, 1939.
  3. Lyrics by Stephane F
Release Info:
MEM-3-1 Apres Jengler A Toi |  Vocalion 05057
MEM-14-1 Te Bonne Pour Moi Estere | Vocalion 05057

Find:
Cajun Vol. 1 Abbeville Breakdown 1929-1939 (CBS, 1990)
Cajun Country, Vol. 2, More Hits from the Swamp (JSP, 2005)