Saturday, November 18, 2017

"Valse De La Louisianne" - Angelas Lejeune

Angelas Lejeune became one of the unsung heros of Cajun music who helped propel Dennis McGee into the fiddle-playing limelight.   Growing up around Pointe Noire, Louisiana, he, Dennis and Ernest Fruge teamed up to play as a trio around south Louisiana.  During one of his sessions in New Orleans for Brunswick records, he recorded the tune "Valse De La Louisianne".  It was a tune that inspired Iry Lejeune's 1954 "La Valse de Cajun".

According to Neal Pomea: 

One listening to the Vieille Valse de la Louisiane, especially the bridge or "turn," will show what a powerful player he was. Brilliant! 1


Ohh, p’tit bébé, viens-toi-z-avec ton pop, ouais, dans la Louisiane.



Ohh, quittes ta mom pour t’en venir avec ton pop pour finir tous nos jours.


Ohh, gardez-donc comment ton pauvre papan est tout le temps dans les douleurs.

Ohh, quittes ton pop et ta mom pour t’en venir avec ton neg dans la Louisiane.

Ohh, jongle bien, tu vas avoir les misères que je passe pour, malheureuse.
Angelas Lejeune

Like many musicians living in south Louisiana, he was a fan of playing music for family. His music was remembered and enjoyed by those that remembered him.  According to neighbor and friend Debi Morain:
How well I remember him playing...he always joined us on Christmas Eve and played for our gatherings.  When I'd visit, he'd always play and sing for us, sitting outside on his porch.  His wife was a 'traiteuse' and treated us for sun and heat strokes.  What wonderful memories I have of them and, of course, his music!
According to his niece Candance McIntyre:

How I loved his music and his singing and the "get-togethers" we all had as a family. His wife aunt Doris was such a sweet lady and she and my grandmother were the greatest of friends.  We would have old time home dancers and that is where I learned to dance and how I love to dance. Listening to this music brings back such warm memories.

Oh, little baby, come with your pop, yeh, to Louisiana.



Oh, leave your mom to come with your pop forever.


Oh, so look at that, how your poor papas always in great sorrow.

Oh, leave your pop and your mom, you come with your man to Louisiana.

Oh, remember well, you'll have the same misery which I passed (lived through), oh my.
According to Cajun accordion player Ambrose Thibodeaux,
I learned La Vielille Valse de la Louisiane from Angelas Lejeune. He recorded it and I listed to him play it. I recorded it in my head. I heard it several times and I'd replay it till I knew it. Angelas was like me, he liked that old waltz a whole lot.3  

According to Cajun musician and accordion builder, Bryan Lafleur, he states:

It's an early version of "Cajun Waltz". I especially love the way he does the turn, which I haven't heard anyone do like him except Michael Doucet in his recording called "Angelas' Waltz", which seemed to be a fiddle copy of Angelas' song.2 





  1. http://npmusic.org/artists.html
  2. Discussions with Bryan L
  3. Ye Yaille Chere by Raymond Francois
  4. Lyrics by Jordy A and Stephane F
Find:
Let Me Play This For You: Rare Cajun Recordings (Tompkins, 2013)

No comments:

Post a Comment

Got info? Pics? Feel free to submit.